Legislation in its best form is designed to be progressive and all encompassing – serving the needs of all. Yet, while a legal system should be unprejudiced; law enforcement and even law-making is sometimes vulnerable to bias. In South Africa specifically, women often seem to be the victims of this bias with gender-based violence and workplace inequalities still rife. If legislation impacting women was to be drafted exclusively by women, and justice enforced by women where women were the victims, would this bring about a desired equality in our legal system and balance the scales of justice?

The Interchange is made possible by Absa and Tshimong.

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The rise of technology has in many ways made everyday life easier and convenient. But, for all its great uses there are also repercussions. The blue collar workforce are losing jobs because technology is replacing them. Tasks that were done by low-level professionals are now performed by inventions such as automated toll boots, supermarket tills and assembly lines in factories. Highly qualified jobs in law and finance are also being threatened by digitisation, robots and other innovations. With the advent of job losses in the 4th Industrial Revolution, would a universal basic income help mitigate the challenge?

The Interchange is made possible by Absa and Tshimong.

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In an ever-changing modern landscape, traditional practices are constantly being questioned and challenged. Many of these controversial cultural practices such as genital mutilation and forced marriages, are rooted in beliefs that have been passed down through generations – making their relevance a contentious issue. In a world where traditions can be treated as fleetingly as a social media hashtag, what role do these old ways still have to play? Should the state have the right to ban or regulate certain cultural practices, especially where human rights are at stake? What must happen when these practices infringe on human rights?

The Interchange is made possible by Absa and Tshimong.

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Drawing on his research around what’s required for the brain to operate at its highest level, Timothy asks South Africans which political party will best position them to live their goals and dreams. From a Neuroscience perspective, the brain requires what’s termed ‘Total Reliable Resources’ in order to operate at its full peak. Essentially, the political party in charge is a critical resource that can provide an environment for your brain to thrive. Hear South Africans from all walks of life open up about their hopes and dreams!

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Rob Hutchinson is the co-founder of OUTA, Dear South Africa, and is currently the Deputy General Secretary of COPE. Rob joins us to discuss the role civil activism plays in South Africa, how political parties tried to shut him down, and how the NDR is used to infiltrate and destroy civil organisations.

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